Voices of dissent; unapologetic, unbridled rage.


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4th July 2014

Quote reblogged from Buzz Andersen with 442 notes

Wealthy Romans employed (or owned as slaves) personal librarians and clerks who copied books borrowed from the libraries of their friends. “I have received the book,” Cicero wrote to his friend Atticus, who had lent him a copy of a geographical work in verse by Alexander of Ephesus. “He’s incompetent as a poet and he knows nothing; however, he’s of some use. I’m having it copied and I’ll return it.” Authors made nothing from the sale of their books; their profits derived from the wealthy patron to whom the work was dedicated. (The arrangement—which helps to account for the fulsome flattery of dedicatory epistles—seems odd to us, but it had an impressive stability, remaining in place until the invention of copyright in the eighteenth century.) Publishers had to contend, as we have seen, with the widespread copying of books among friends, but the business of producing and marketing books must have been a profitable one: there were bookshops not only in Rome but also in Brindisi, Carthage, Lyons, Reims, and other cities in the empire.

Stephen Greenblatt: “The Swerve: How the World Became Modern

Who would have thought that the pre-moveable type Romans had a publishing industry based on the expectation of widespread copying and relying on fan patronage for financial support?

(via buzz)

Tagged: copyrightcopyleftcreative commonsopen source

3rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Soup with 73 notes

soupsoup:

As more information about the NSA’s spy program leaks, Internet users are exploring encryption options. A new report suggests searching for privacy software online can make you a target for the NSA.

soupsoup:

As more information about the NSA’s spy program leaks, Internet users are exploring encryption options. A new report suggests searching for privacy software online can make you a target for the NSA.

Tagged: privacynsa

2nd July 2014

Photo

An LOL from that same thread about net neutrality, lobbying and corruption. 

An LOL from that same thread about net neutrality, lobbying and corruption

Tagged: FCCComcastRedditnet neutralitylobbyistsObamacorruption

2nd July 2014

Photo

This article on Ars Technica about how the representatives who voted against Net Neutrality also take buckets of money from cable company lobbyists led to this hella informative thread with all kinds of info about lobbying and corruption. 
From that thread, here’s the list of all the representatives who voted against Net Neutrality, along with the amount of reported money they got from cable lobbyists.

This article on Ars Technica about how the representatives who voted against Net Neutrality also take buckets of money from cable company lobbyists led to this hella informative thread with all kinds of info about lobbying and corruption

From that thread, here’s the list of all the representatives who voted against Net Neutrality, along with the amount of reported money they got from cable lobbyists.

Tagged: FCCnet neutralitylobbyingComcastcorruptionmoney in politics

1st June 2014

Photo reblogged from Neil Gaiman with 472,601 notes

perfectvic:

LITERALLY MY FAVORITE

perfectvic:

LITERALLY MY FAVORITE

Source: punkypunk

27th May 2014

Link reblogged from terribleminds with 371 notes

Not All Men, But Too Many Men →

From the link:

Just remember that the men go on dates thinking they won’t get laid, and women go on dates thinking they might get raped, punched, maybe killed. Remember that as a man you can say all kinds of shit and add “lol” at the end of it and nobody gives a shit, but as a woman anything you say might be interpreted as antagonistic and end up with rape threats or death threats. Remember that any seemingly safe space — train station, bookstore, social media, city park — is an opportunity for a man to catch a train or read a book, but is also an opportunity for a woman to be the subject of threat or sexual violence.

terribleminds:

[crossposted from terribleminds.com, which has been yo-yoing up and down]

A young man felt spurned by women and shot people because of it. He drove up and fired a weapon out of a BMW and committed murder, leaving behind a video and a manifesto about his rage against women. He felt rejected…

13th May 2014

Photo with 13 notes

The reason I’m a feminist.

The reason I’m a feminist.

Tagged: feminismfeministcomicsweb comics

15th November 2013

Photo reblogged from The Atlantic with 125 notes

theatlantic:

The Stupidly Basic Thing It’s Still Illegal To Do With Your Mobile Phone

Do you own a smart phone? Do you know how easy it is to break the law using only that smartphone?
It’s this easy: After your current contract with your wireless provider (perhaps Verizon) expires, change the software on your phone such that you can use it to make calls with a different provider (say, T-Mobile). There, you just broke the law.
That’s right: Using a phone—purchased by you—to legally connect to another mobile network has broken federal law since October 2012. But on Thursday, the lead regulator of the mobile phone industry took a major, formal step to not only making phone unlocking legal—but making it easier, and making it free.
This dispute has long pitted consumers and their advocates against some of the major mobile carriers: AT&T, Verizon, and US Cellular among them. Some mobile carriers, including T-Mobile and Sprint, already allow unlocking.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

The Stupidly Basic Thing It’s Still Illegal To Do With Your Mobile Phone

Do you own a smart phone? Do you know how easy it is to break the law using only that smartphone?

It’s this easy: After your current contract with your wireless provider (perhaps Verizon) expires, change the software on your phone such that you can use it to make calls with a different provider (say, T-Mobile). There, you just broke the law.

That’s right: Using a phone—purchased by you—to legally connect to another mobile network has broken federal law since October 2012. But on Thursday, the lead regulator of the mobile phone industry took a major, formal step to not only making phone unlocking legal—but making it easier, and making it free.

This dispute has long pitted consumers and their advocates against some of the major mobile carriers: AT&T, Verizon, and US Cellular among them. Some mobile carriers, including T-Mobile and Sprint, already allow unlocking.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

7th October 2013

Post reblogged from SnoopSister with 1 note

Should the US Trade Embargo be lifted?

First of all, Cuba may be changing but they’ve been pushing some progressive measures since before Castro got sick. They offer free health care; people may be poor but they have good teeth. Free education through college. Because their main trade in sugar has crashed (even without the embargo, hard to compete with the US in sugar) farmers are paid to go to school and learn new trades. They have state-run vegetarian restaurants to fight the rise in heart disease.

I’m not saying they don’t have problems. They do. Every country does. And for some of the countries, the worst of the worst, we embargo. But Cuba is not the worst of the worst. Cuba does not have the corruption of many of the US’s trading partners. Mexico comes to mind. We’ve made some questionable trades with Nicaragua and Columbia. When you start to compare, it doesn’t make sense that Cuba is singled out.

Second, the point about Florida tourism is an interesting one. Personally I don’t give a damn if people visit Florida, but I can see where it pays to be strategic. The politician who says “every tourist is going to go South” is thinking small. Sure, Florida may lose some American tourists should a new wonderland become available South of the border. But he’s surely ignorant of what a huge tourist draw Havana is. People from all over the world go there, and if they could combine it with a short flight to Miami or Orlando, why wouldn’t they? If you’ve flown ten hours go get to Havana, a puddle-jumper flight to Florida feels on the way. You’d see a lot of international tourists coming to Florida, maybe not a big a jump for Disney but probably a lot more for Miami, Fort Lauderdale and the Florida Keys.

snoopsister:

U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor is asking President Barack Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry to

"open talks to lead to greater trade and travel opportunities. "Cuba is changing," said Castor, D-Tampa. Easing the restrictions would offer the United States a variety of benefits, Castor said: a new market for manufacturers who cannot sell to Cuba now, more influence over a Cuban offshore oil drilling industry whose antiquated technology could threaten Florida beaches, and an opportunity for Tampa to become a tourism gateway to the island.  

Now here is the parallax view.

Because the economy in Florida is greatly based on tourism, would opening Cuba to tourism hurt Florida?

"If the travel ban is lifted, there ain’t going to be a tourist in our neck of the woods for five years, because every tourist is going to go south," Tampa lawyer and longtime anti-Castro activist Ralph Fernandez has said.

Cuba IS in a period of potential change. President Raul Castro, who succeeded his ailing older brother as president in 2008, has been pushing through cautious reforms. And Fidel, 81, announced last month that he would step down as president after his second term ends in 2018. But how do we know how much of the money is going to support the government? Or is it going to is extending the regime’s credit?

Tagged: Cubacuban embargoFlorida

5th October 2013

Link reblogged from SnoopSister with 1 note

Cellulose = wood pulp →

snoopsister:

image Take a look at the ingredient list for your high-fiber cereal or snack bar, and you’ll probably see an ingredient called “cellulose.” Turns out that cellulose is a code word for “wood pulp.” Food manufacturers use it to extend their products and add fiber, so it looks like you’re getting more…

Tagged: yuckfoodhealthadditivesdiet